Group Leader Profiles

Displaying 1 - 36 of 36
Research

Prof. Dr. Ali Alavi

Director at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF)
homepage
Electronic Structure Theory

The research in the Electronic Structure Theory department is largely concerned with the development of accurate methods to solve many-electron Schrodinger and more generally many-body type eigenvalue problems, which can handle electron correlation and spin-related phenomena, as well as ameliorating basis set errors which rise from slow-basis set convergence which appears in ab initio descriptions. These are problems for which exact solutions generally require exponentially large amounts of computer resources. Progress in such problems usually requires approximate techniques, such as stochastic diagonalisation and related active-space methods, coupled-cluster theory, as well as explicitly correlated methods such as "transcorrelation".

We welcome enquiries from qualified individuals (with a Masters in a relevant field of theoretical chemistry or physics).

Dr. Giovanni Li Manni, group leader at the Electronic Structure Theory Department offers a PhD position in the Field of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry for Enlightening open-shell 3d Metal Complexes through Compressed Ligand Fields. More info can be found here



Research Method and Area:
Theoretical and Experimental
Chemistry

Prof. Claudio Castelnovo

Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge
homepage

I am part of the Theory of Condensed Matter group at the Cavendish Laboratory. My interests lie in the area of emergent and out of equilibrium phenomena in strongly correlated many body systems. Current research topics include the effects of hard constraints in classical and quantum systems; freezing and glassiness; response and equilibration properties of systems with fractionalised excitations; frustrated magnetism; topological order, quantum information and quantum computing.



Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Physics

Prof. Andrea Cavalleri

Director Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg and Professor of Physics (part time) at the University of Oxford
homepage

The Condensed Matter Dynamics group is led by Prof. Andrea Cavalleri and focuses on non-equilibrium phenomena in solids. Especially, we investigate how electronic and structural order can emerge as a result external drives, how transitions occur in solids dynamically and how energy flows into and away from a solid. Light-control of superconductivity, ferroelectricity, magnetism and of topological phase transitions have been at the centre of our research.



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Material Science, Physics

Dr. Laura Classen

Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF)
homepage
Correlated Phases in Quantum Materials

The understanding of fundamental, physical processes in quantum materials and the identification of universal aspects among them constitutes a necessary basis for the design of new quantum materials with desired functionalities. Our group investigates the collective behavior of interacting electrons which gives rise to the many fascinating phases of matter in quantum materials. We seek to explain the underlying mechanisms behind the phase formation and to determine characteristic properties of the different phases.We are particularly interested in situations when excitations of different phases strongly interact so that it is essential to consider their mutual influence on each other. This includes, for example, the study of quantum phase transitions or unconventional superconductivity. To account for the decisive role of interactions and the interplay of different degrees of freedom in these complex situations, we employ modern, field-theoretical tools with an emphasis on renormalization group techniques. We make use of microscopic and effective descriptions inspired by experimental observations to obtain a comprehensive picture of correlated phases in quantum materials.



Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Physics

Prof. Andrea Damascelli

Full Professor at the Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, UBC, Canada
homepage

Our group develops and utilizes angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and its time- and spin-resolved variants, as well as resonant x-ray scattering (RXS), to push the limits of these techniques and gain a deeper understanding of quantum materials and new phases of matter. Leveraging facilities established at QMI in the UBC-Moore Centre for Ultrafast Quantum Matter and the Quantum Materials Spectroscopy Centre at the Canadian Light Source, we pursue the engineering of the electronic structures of these materials through in situ adatom deposition, strain, and the optical coherent control of electronic states via pulsed laser excitations.



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics

Séamus Davis

Professor of Physics at the Oxford University, UK, Professor of Quantum Physics at the University of College Cork, Ireland, Fellow at the Max Planck Graduate Center for Quantum Materials and Emeritus Professor of Physics at the Cornell University
homepage

Davis Group research concentrates upon the fundamental physics of exotic states of electronic, magnetic and atomic quantum matter. A specialty is development of innovative instrumentation to allow direct atomic-scale visualization or perception of the quantum many-body phenomena that are characteristic of these states.

Research Topics:

  • electronic liquid crystals
  • Cooper-pair density wave states
  • monopole and spin liquids
  • magnetic topological insulators
  • Cu/Fe high-Tc superconductors
  • viscous electron fluids
  • macroscopic quantum mechanics
  • quantum microscope development


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical and Experimental
Physics

Dr. Claire Donnelly

Lise Meitner Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (MPI CPfS)
homepage

Research topics:

  • Magnetic topological textures and their dynamics
  • Advanced nanofabrication of functional nanostructures
  • Geometric control of magnetic and superconducting properties in nanodevices
  • Synchrotron X-ray magnetic microscopy of magnetic textures


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical and Experimental
Material Science, Physics

Prof. Claudia Draxl

Professor at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany and Fellow at the Max Planck Graduate Center for Quantum Materials
homepage

Research topics:

  • many-body interactions in low-dimensional materials
  • optoelectronic excitations at oxides, perovskites, and inorganic/organic interfaces
  • ab-intio method and code development
  • data-centric approaches to materials science


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Computer Science, Material Science, Physics

Prof. Claudia Felser

Director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (MPI CPfS)
homepage

Research topics:

  • Heusler compounds with X2YZ with L21 and XYZ with C1b structure type
  • topological insulators, Weyl semimetals, new Fermions
  • thermoelectric materials, topological catalysis
  • non-centrosymmetric superconductivity


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical and Experimental
Chemistry, Physics

Prof. Anna Fontcuberta i Morral

Full professor at the EPFL Lausanne and Fellow at the Max Planck Graduate Center for Quantum Materials
homepage

Research topics:

  • epitaxial synthesis of novel materials
  • synthesis and properties of free standing and interconnected 1D structures
  • nanophotonics for efficient photon harvesting


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical and Experimental
Physics

Elena Gati

Group Leader at Max-Planck-Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden
homepage

Research topics:

 

·      Correlated quantum materials: unconventional superconductors, Mott insulators, frustrated magnets, low-dimensional magnets

·      Strain and pressure tuning

·      Thermodynamic and transport measurements

·      Elastic properties of quantum materials in the non-linear regime



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics

Prof. Bernhard Keimer

Director at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF) Speaker of the IMPRS-CMS
homepage
Physics of Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

The department uses neutron and X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy as well as optical spectroscopy and Raman scattering to explore the structure and dynamics of materials with strong electron correlations. We also have a strong effort in the development of new spectroscopic methods. As the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists is essential for progress in this field, a small theory group operates within the department.



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics

Prof. Dr. Klaus Kern

Director at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF) & Professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne
homepage
Nanoscale Science

Nanoscience and nanotechnology; surfaces and interfaces; self-organisation phenomena and epitaxial growth; fabrication and characterization of metal, semiconductor and molecular nanostructures; molecular electronics; carbon nanotubes and graphene; clusters and nanocrystals; interactions and processes on the atomic and molecular scale; scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy; nanooptics



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics

Dr. Simon Krause

Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF)
homepage
Dynamic framework materials and molecular machines

Our interdisciplinary research group explores how to teach crystals tricks of living matter by investigating dynamic features of molecular framework materials such as metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks (MOFs and COFs). By specifically tuning the structural topology of the framework, we create soft porous crystals which exhibit pore contraction and/or expansion as a response to the adsorption of gases and fluids or external triggers such as light irradiation. Such materials can act as responsive cargo-release systems, nanoscopic sensors or feature counterintuitive phenomena such as negative gas adsorption. We furthermore construct frameworks which contain molecular machines such as light-driven molecular motors and switches as responsive and intrinsically dynamic building blocks. We aim towards collective operating molecular machines in the solid state which are able to actively transport molecules in the pore space and facilitate dynamic conversion and storage of energy carriers and other small molecules. Our diverse team uses a wide range of synthetic and experimental tools and collaborates in national and international research projects to push the boundaries of dynamic features in crystalline solids.



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Chemistry, Material Science

Prof. Dr. Bettina Lotsch

Max Planck Research Group Leader "Nanochemistry" at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF) & Professor at the LMU Munich
homepage
Nanochemistry

Our research explores the rational synthesis of new functional materials by combining the tools of molecular, solid-state and nanochemistry. Research interests include the design of organic, inorganic and hybrid materials for solar energy conversion and storage, ion conductors for electrochemical energy storage, and “smart” photonic crystals for optical sensing. We aim at creating function from both atomic-scale structure and nanoscale morphology, with a strong emphasis on exploring structure-property relationships based on a variety of diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. Recent activities include the development of molecular frameworks for solar batteries, “dark” photocatalysis, photomemristive sensors, and (photo)electrocatalytic CO2 conversion, the development of quantum materials for (photo)electrocatalysis, as well as the design of lithium and sodium thiophosphate and sulfide solid electrolytes for all-solid-state batteries. 



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Chemistry

Andrew Mackenzie

Director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (MPI CPfS)
homepage

Research topics:

  • low temperature ordered states
  • interacting electron mesoscopics
  • thermodynamic and transport measurements on interacting electron systems


Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Chemistry, Physics

PD Dr. Jochen Mannhart

Director at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF)
homepage
Solid State Quantum Electronics

The department explores interfaces in complex materials to create and understand new electronic systems, materials, and novel physical phenomena. This work is fundamental science in an area that is also of interest for possible applications. Complex oxide heterostructures are synthesized on the atomic scale by using advanced epitaxial growth techniques. Lateral confinement on the nanometer scale, for example by e-beam lithography, is applied to create complex 1D and 0D electronic systems. The department is furthermore striving to understand and advance thermoelectronic energy conversion, with the goal of creating a method to convert with very high efficiency solar radiation or heat into electricity.



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics

Dr. James McIver

Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg
homepage

Research topics:

  • 2D materials and van der Waals heterostructures
  • Floquet topological insulators
  • ultrafast optoelectronics and opto-spintronics
  • on-chip THz spectroscopy
  • coherent light-matter interaction


Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics

Prof. Dr. Walter Metzner

Director at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF)
homepage
Quantum Many-Body Theory

In the Quantum Many-Body Theory department, electronic properties of solids are analyzed and computed with a main emphasis on systems where electronic correlations play a crucial role, such as high temperature superconductor and other transition metal oxides. Besides bulk properties of one-, two- and three-dimensional systems also surface states of topological phases, as well as problems with a mesoscopic length scale such as quantum dots, quantum wires, and quantum Hall systems are being studied. The correlation problem is treated by various modern numerical and field-theoretical techniques.



Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Physics

Prof. Dr. Roderich Moessner

Director of the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (MPI PKS)
homepage

Research topics:

  • theory of quantum materials:
  • collective phenomena
  • new kinds of order
  • quantum dynamics


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Physics

Prof. Philip Moll

Director of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter
homepage

Research topics:

  • Correlated and topological systems including heavy fermions, high-Tc and Dirac/Weyl/multifold materials
  • 3D structural deformation in crystalline structures and its impact on quantum transport
  • Size effects and shaping microstructured crystals
  • Physical properties in high magnetic fields
  • Focused Ion Beam fabrication of quantum materials
  • Prototyping of novel materials in applications


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical and Experimental
Material Science, Physics

Prof. Dr. Stuart Parkin

Director of the Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Halle
homepage

Research topics:

  • spintronics
  • nano-photonics
  • topological materials
  • neuromorphic devices


Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics

Dr. Mariana Rossi

Lise Meitner Research Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg
homepage

Research Topics:

  • Nuclear quantum effects in molecules, solids, liquids and interfaces
  • Electron-phonon coupling in organic and inorganic systems
  • Advanced simulations of vibrational spectroscopy techniques in liquid and solid state
  • Structure search techniques aided by machine learning


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Chemistry, Computer Science, Material Science, Physics

Prof. Angel Rubio

Director of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg
homepage

Research topics:

  • new exotic states of matter out of equilibrium: Topological materials
  • QED-Chemistry and Materials
  • fundamental aspects of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory and Many-Body Perturbation Theory
  • strong light-matter interactions and Optimal control Theory
  • electronic and Thermal transport
  • nanostructures: 2D materials, nanotubes
  • code development: development of the first principles open-sorce project octopus (https://octopus-code.org/)


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Physics

Prof. Vahid Sandoghdar

Director of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Erlangen
homepage

Research topics:

  • photon-phonon interactions in organic materials
  • plasmonics
  • single-molecule quantum optics
  • bio-photonics


Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics

Dr. Thomas Schäfer

Head of Research Group at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF)
homepage
Theory of Strongly Correlated Quantum Matter

Materials with strong electronic correlations are amongst the most intriguing topics at the forefront of research in condensed matter physics. On the one hand, they exhibit fascinating phenomena like quantum criticality and high-temperature superconductivity, bearing a high potential for applications. On the other hand, they are theoretically very appealing due to their limited understanding, even on the very fundamental level. Within the research group “Theory of Strongly Correlated Quantum Matter”, starting from September 2020, the frontier of this fundamental understanding is pushed by applying cutting-edge numerical quantum field theoretical methods to quantum critical systems, high-temperature superconductors, Mott insulators and magnetically frustrated systems, both in the purely model (Hubbard model, periodic Anderson model) as well as material oriented (heavy fermions, cuprates, organics) context.



Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Physics

Prof. Dr. Matthias Scheffler

Director of the Novel-Materials Discovery Laboratory at the Fritz Haber Institute
homepage

Research Topics:

  • ab initio thermodynamics and statistical mechanics
  • many-body electronic-structure theory and electron-phonon coupling
  • electronic and thermal transport
  • nuclear quantum effects in materials
  • artificial intelligence methods for materials science


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Material Science, Physics

Dr. Andreas Schnyder

Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF)
homepage
Theory of Topological Quantum Matter

Our research group studies electronic and magnetic structures of quantum materials. A special focus is on topological materials, which exhibit unusual properties, such as exotic surface states and anomalous transport phenomena, that are unaffected by continuous deformations, e.g., stretching, compressing, or twisting. Our aim is to develop a theoretical framework to describe these topological properties, and to find new ways how to use them in the laboratory and for device applications. We seek to classify topological materials in terms of symmetries and to discover new remarkable examples. Current research priorities focus on the topological properties of nodal-line semimetals, topological metals with nodal planes, quantum magnets, and unconventional superconductors, which we study using both analytical and numerical techniques.



Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Physics

Dr. Niels Schroeter

Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Halle
homepage

Research topics: Spectroscopy of quantum materials:

  • New fermionic quasiparticles in chiral crystals
  • Topological materials and interfaces
  • Heterostructures for quantum devices


Research Method and Area:
Theoretical and Experimental
Physics

Dr. Aparajita Singha

Emmy Noether research groupleader at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF)
homepage
Quantum sensing

Research:

  • Quantum sensing at the atomic scale beyond 4 K
  • Non-invasive magnetic imaging and coherent quantum control of single spin-qubits
  • Exploring novel surface-supported spin systems


Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Material Science, Physics

Dr. rer. nat. habil. Jurgen Smet

Max Planck Research Group Leader "Solid State Nanophysics" at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF)
homepage
Solid State Nanophysics

Research in the Solid State Nanophysics Group focuses on the study of the many unusual ways in which electrons organize themselves as a result of interactions and correlations among their charge and spin degrees of freedom, when these electrons are confined in one or more dimensions on the nanometer scale. Transport and optical properties are investigated with local probe methods, at low temperatures, in high magnetic fields, under high frequency radiation or any combination thereof. The electrons are confined in strictly two-dimensional crystals such as graphene or other single layers of the large class of layered materials with weak interlayer forces. Also hybrid stacks of these two-dimensional crystals are fabricated and explored in a quest for novel functionalities and interaction physics.



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics

Prof. Dr. Hidenori Takagi

Director at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (MPI-FKF) & Professor at the University of Tokyo & Humboldt Professor at the University of Stuttgart
homepage
Quantum Materials

Entanglement of electrons (electron correlations) in solids, in combination with details of the crystal lattice structure, produce a surprisingly rich variety of electronic phases, that are liquid, liquid-crystal and crystalline states of the charge and spin degrees of freedom. These complex electronic phases and the subtle competition among them very often give rise to novel functionality. The department will be studying these interesting novel phases in transition metal oxides and related compounds where the narrow d-bands, which give rise to strong electron correlations, in combination with the rich chemistry of such materials provides excellent opportunities for new discoveries. The goal of this research will be to hunt for new materials exhibiting exotic electronic states of matter, showing phenomena such as superconductivity or high thermoelectricity, and to explore them with advanced measurement techniques to unveil the physical mechanisms that could be drivers of potentially highly desirable functionality.



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Chemistry, Physics

Prof. Dr. Liu Tjeng

Director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (MPI CPfS)
homepage

The spectacular physical properties often observed in materials containing transition metal and rare-earth elements challenge our comprehension of solid state physics These properties include superconductivity, unusually large magneto-resistance, metal-insulator transitions, heavy-fermion behaviour, multiferroicity, and phenomena involving topologically protected states. We would like to understand how the electrons in such materials interact with each other as to generate those unusual quantum phenomena.



Research Method and Area:
Theoretical and Experimental
Physics

Dr. Uri Vool

Independent group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (MPI CPfS)
homepage

The goal of the Quantum Information for Quantum Materials group is to utilize coherent quantum systems as sensors to explore novel materials and collective quantum effects, and utilize quantum materials to create novel hybrid quantum systems. The group mainly specializes in two experimental techniques: quantum scanning magnetometry based on nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, and hybrid superconducting circuits integrated with quantum materials.



Research Method and Area:
Theoretical and Experimental
Physics

Alexander Wietek, Ph.D.

Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems
homepage

Superconductivity and Magnetic Correlations

Our group is interested in the way quantum particles, like electrons or atoms, organize themselves while interacting with one another. This way, we aim at understanding how the macroscopic behavior of materials, like various forms of magnetism or superconductivity, emerges. Besides trying to explain existing experimental phenomena in solid-state physics, I investigate under which circumstances entirely new states of matter, like quantum spin liquids, can occur.

To solve these questions, we are developing numerical technology to simulate quantum many-body systems. The quantum many-body problem is considered to be exponentially hard in the number of particles. One approach we are pursuing is to push the limits of exact simulations by developing high-performance computing software and distributed parallel algorithms for quantum many-body systems. Furthermore, we are also embracing tensor network methods to reduce computational complexity by representing data efficiently.



Research Method and Area:
Theoretical
Computer Science, Material Science, Physics

Prof. Dr. Jörg Wrachtrup

Director of the 3rd Physics Institute, University of Stuttgart
homepage
Solid State Quantum Physics and Technology

The group capitalizes on generating synthetic spin systems in solids envisioning their precise quantum optical control. In the course of that research, spin arrays in insulators like e.g. diamond are generated and individual spin states are controlled. The systems provide a means to understand and develop control mechanisms in complex interaction many particle systems. Specifically engineered spin states are used for ultraprecise field measurements. Solid state quantum optics and magneto optics commences via integration of those structures in cavities and plasmonic resonators. Among the major long term research goals is the integration of mechanical and spin systems with the aim to explore the quantum mechanics of hybrid quantum systems with a large degree of freedom and precise unitary control.



Research Method and Area:
Experimental
Physics